Do you know what your character is thinking?

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Ariel

  • 330
Re: Do you know what your character is thinking?
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2010, 11:36:05 PM »
This might be relevant to your theory Vx:

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/folkpsych-simulation/

Re: Do you know what your character is thinking?
« Reply #16 on: July 07, 2010, 12:41:57 AM »
Vincent, those are some good insights. Here's what I'm thinking. This bit:

"It gives you deep insights into your character that turn out, on reflection, to be deep insights into yourself, your friends, and the world."

Is what I'm talking about.

I mean, all this is basically a fancy way of saying that the characters still don't exist. Which is a simple point and should be obvious and yet it seems to be so difficult.

Here's a thing then: Does the "affirmed rightness of your vision" suffer if you don't have explicit authority over a character's feelings and such?

What different feelings do these rules give you?

The Fear Giver
When you see the Fear Giver for the first time, roll +cool

10+ you're fine
7-9, choose one of the following:
You cower and whimper
You drop what you're carrying
Take -1 forward
On a miss, all three, and you're acting under fire to approach the Fear Giver

Or

The Fear Giver
When you see the Fear Giver for the first time, roll +cool

10+ You're fine
7-9 You're afraid
On a miss, You're afraid and take -1 forward.

Or

The Fear Eater
When you feel afraid, and the Fear Eater can see you, roll +hard

10+ You're fine
7-9 You take 1 harm (ap)
On a miss, you take 3 harm (ap)

I dunno. What would they do to the game?

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lumpley

  • 1291
Re: Do you know what your character is thinking?
« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2010, 11:10:05 AM »
Well, I mean, the idea that characters don't exist isn't difficult. It's just awfully obvious. I don't see any reason to keep reaffirming it.

Here's a thing then: Does the "affirmed rightness of your vision" suffer if you don't have explicit authority over a character's feelings and such?

Exactly. I think it does -- I think that of COURSE it does. In "trick of the brain" terms, it baffles your brain's ability to suppose that your character has an internal life. In "plans, not secrets" terms, it's a direct attack upon your ability to plan for your character.

Your three moves are good! Good call.

Fear giver 1 tells you what your character does, with some wiggle room for your vision, and then lets you draw your own conclusions about your character's emotions. Even if they're pretty much foregone conclusions, it's still important that your brain's the one drawing them.

Fear eater 3 is very cool. It implies that you would, in play, confess your character's emotional state, even when it's not to your character's advantage for the MC to know it. It presupposes your integrity about it; it presupposes that being upfront about your character's emotions is more valuable than preserving your character's health. That's cool.

-Vincent

Re: Do you know what your character is thinking?
« Reply #18 on: July 07, 2010, 04:20:06 PM »
I think this helps clarify why I completely lose interest in a character I'm playing if anyone else (usually the GM) plays him if I miss a session. I get brought up to speed on what has happened during my absence and I'm generally like "Wtf? I don't know this guy." And then I completely move on from that character emotionally.