Three Stats?

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Three Stats?
« on: February 26, 2013, 02:00:31 PM »
I am in the same game as Fuseboy (I played the two Commandos and am now The Sergeant). Tim and I were discussing this before the last game, and we think that there is probably no need for five stats in The Regiment. We were thinking that Guts (Guts/Part of Battle/Part of Leadership) Tactics (Tactics, Part of Battle/Part of Leadership) and Lucky really cover what is called for in the game.

Re: Three Stats?
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 09:47:29 AM »
If you were going to make a compelling argument in this direction, I think you'd need to investigate the allocation of moves to stats, and the role that plays in differentiating playbooks. A matrix! A matrix!

Re: Three Stats?
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2013, 05:21:23 PM »
Three stats collapses the range of playbook differentiation. Not a bad thing, just not what we're going for.

That said, some stats are under-utilized (Lucky) and that's something I'm addressing in the new draft.

Re: Three Stats?
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2013, 08:47:01 AM »
When I say three stats, it should be pointed out that there are in fact five stats that routinely come up (plus WOUNDS, which I almost think should be rolled into LUCKY somehow). As to the matrix, I would suggest something like:

When you . . .
assault an enemy position . . .
lead by example . . .
keep it together under pressure . . .
perform a combat action requiring bravery, steel, or resolve . . .
roll GUTS.

When you . . .
provide covering fire for your team . . .
give orders . . .
pause for a moment to assess the situation . . .
camouflage or hide something . . .
perform a combat action requiring intelligence or logical thinking . . .
roll TACTICS.

When you . . .
take cover under fire . . .
scrounge for supplies . . .
perform a combat action requiring luck or where the critical portion is out of your control . . .
roll LUCKY.

When you . . .
start a new engagement . . .
have a (not otherwise unwilling) NPC take an action on your behalf or under your direction . . .
perform a combat action which is carried out by NPC soldiers. . .
roll OP.

When you . . .
petition up the chain of command . . .
spend time improving your bond with someone . . .
barter for goods or services . . .
roll SMOKES spent.

I think three stats evens out and clarifies what each are used for without meaningfully reducing flavor. I think 'collapsing the range of playbook differentiation' is the wrong way to look at it, as the unique moves are what most meaningfully distinguishes playbooks--if a high stat distinguishes all the actions a character does in his role, there is little point of having multiple stats to begin with.